Day 2: The Silence of Scholastica

40 day challenge 20th

Today we begin by offering the Prayer of Abandonment. 

I’ve always had a special fondness for St. Scholastica, the twin sister of St. Benedict. St. Gregory the Great records what little we know of her life, including the story of the last time she saw her brother in their annual meeting place between their two cloisters. As the day drew to a close, she begged her brother to remain there and talk with her through the night — but he was eager to get back to the monastery. Seeing further entreaty was pointless, she simply asked God to keep him from going. And God sent a storm. After talking through the night, brother and sister parted ways, and shortly after that Benedict saw a dove ascend to heaven, and understood his sister had died.

scholastica2The silence of Scholastica is the theme of today’s “reflection for two.” How often do we find ourselves in a situation when the best and most uplifting thing we can do for our marriage is . . . to remain silent, and pray for God’s gentle action in our hearts?

Early in my marriage, I found it almost impossible to let a day go by without offering some kind of (unsolicited) wifely advice. (Most of it was ignored, but to his credit he never lost his temper!) As time went on, however, I realized that the constant criticism was eating away at his confidence, particularly where the kids were concerned. On the other hand, the more I affirmed my confidence in his ability to handle things, the more our family benefitted!

And so today, as you offer your “Prayer of Abandonment,” ask God to remind you (gently) the next time he wants you to follow the example of Scholastica, to say nothing at all and to ask him to reach your husband’s heart in a way you feel you cannot. God bless you!

Teresa-21

If you are enjoying this Lenten series, please support the effort if possible by picking up a copy of Lent with Saint Teresa of Calcutta. Thank you!

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Thanks, Ken!

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Please tune in today at 3:30 EST to hear “Meet the Author” host Ken Huck and me chat about Lent with Saint Teresa of Calcutta. This program is live on the Radio Maria Network from 3-4 p.m. Eastern

If you miss it (or don’t get the program in your area),  you can  listen in here!

Good Morning, Iowa!

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Special thanks to Julie Nelson and Chris Magruder, who will be chatting with me for the benefit of their listeners on Iowa Catholic Radio (Des Moines) on “Catholic Women Now”!

So tune in with us on Thursday, February 23 at 10:00 a.m. Or you can listen by clicking the link here.

Let’s see if I can get Julie and Chris to take The 40 Day Challenge!”

On the Feast of Holy Innocents

peek babySee, the home of God is among mortals.

He will dwell with them as their God;

they will be his peoples,

and God himself will be with them;

he will wipe every tear from their eyes.

Death will be no more;

morning and crying and pain will be no more,

for the first things have passed away.

Revelation 21:3-4

Close on the heels of Christmas joy comes a solemn feast, in which we recall the children slaughtered by Herod’s soldiers in his insatiable quest for power. Nowhere are the names of these innocents recorded for posterity. All we know is that the Church remembers them each year as martyrs, souls who suffered unjustly, and in that suffering made participants in the reign of God. In their brush with Immortality, the Word made flesh, they themselves were made immortal.

From life to death to life eternal, this is the pathway each of us has been called to walk. In the past year, thousands of souls have made that journey toward eternity, to experience a new kind of “Emmanuel, God is with us.” Perhaps you lost someone dear to you this year, too, and have experienced the truth of the words of Mother Teresa:

Death can be something beautiful. It is like going home. He who dies in God goes home even though we naturally miss that person who has gone. But it is something beautiful. That person has gone home to God.

Is there someone you need to release into the arms of God right now? Someone whose absence weighs upon your heart with longing and regret? Or do you know someone who is fighting this all-too-common human battle, and struggling to endure? If so, close your eyes and feel the prayers of your sisters in faith, who are praying for you right now. You are not forgotten. If not . . . please join in the prayer, for those in need of strength.

Saint Teresa of Calcutta, mother of the heartsick and suffering, pray for us.

heidi-2013 About the Author

Heidi Hess Saxton is a Catholic wife and adoptive mother of two teenagers, and author of Advent with Saint Teresa of Calcutta and Lent with Saint Teresa of Calcutta (Servant). This year she spent Christmas with her elderly parents and sisters, who gathered in Georgia to spend one more Christmas baking cookies with their mom, who is ready to go meet Jesus. She would appreciate your prayers.

Thanks, Catholic Forum!

Teresa-21This morning at 10:05 (or you can listen to the podcast here), Bob Krebs and I chat about Mother Teresa and the lessons I learned from her books on “The Catholic Forum.”

Wilmington listeners, if you already have your Advent reading planned, consider my next book,
Lent with St. Teresa of Calcutta,
which will be coming out in January!